Posts tagged ‘wheat free recipes’

October 25, 2011

venison gnocchi stroganoff

I just love gifts of little brown bundles of game! I was so pleased when my sweetie came home with ground venison after visiting his buddy the other day! Venison is among my most favourite meats… along with moose, goat and buffalo. I was humming over how to best use this lovely bundle, and I couldn’t say no when the cute “deer deliver boy” requested stroganoff. Plus it gave me a chance to highlight my wonderful home made HP sauce, which is the perfect addition to a meaty sauce.

In a deep cast iron pan begin to brown:

1/2 lb of ground venison

1/2 of a large yellow onion chopped

3 cloves of garlic minced

a little glug of olive oil

let these get a little golden before adding:

1/2 of a large green pepper finely sliced

5 sliced mushrooms

season with:

S+P (heavy on the pepper)

1 tbsp of paprika

a handful of fresh parsley finely chopped

about 2 tbsp of Worcestershire sauce

1/2 cup of my homemade HP sauce

simmer the works in a broth of:

1/2 cup of beer (what ever kind your drinking while you make dinner)

2 cups of water mixed with 1 tbsp potato starch (you could use flour or organic corn starch as a thickener too)

1 bay leaf

Let this all bubble away for about 20 minutes

In a separate pot cook gnocchi’s in boiling water and once they start popping to the top and floating they are ready to strain and add to the pan along with 1 cup of goat milk (or cream). Stir well and allow everything to come to a final low boil, before covering and removing from heat. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving, then garnish with fresh herbs and dig in. This stroganoff  won’t last long so don’t plan for left overs!

enjoy

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April 8, 2011

roasted banana buckwheat coffee cake with hemp streusel crunch

I hope you find this recipe as easy and divine as it truly is. Don’t get hung up on the roasting, the sifting, or the 1/2’s and 1/3’s… lots of baking recipes that read as complex are actually just a series of simple steps you can do while your waiting for peaks to stiff, or the oven to come to temp, etc. Also sifting flour is an easy way to get lovely fluffy cakes and muffins. and stopping to scrap your mixer bowl and incorporating ingredient slowly while balancing wet and dry is the best way to get results which will make you happy every time.

About 5 years ago I made some roasted banana and nut spring rolls (which I should revisit as they were unreal) It turned out though that I ran out of spring roll wrappers and had a couple cups of roasted banana nut puree left over which I whipped into a banana bread. Once I did that, there was no going back for me, I have never made banana bread again without first roasting the bananas. What a delicious way to add a deep complex flavor to a baked goodie!

Enough though about all of that, lets talk about this lovely buckwheat cake! This recipe is adapted from a cinnamon streusel coffee cake recipe I love from the Art & Soul of Baking. My variation (as usual) is made with ancient grains and almond butter laced with the caramel wisps of fresh dates and a hint of cocoa. Lots of people think they don’t like dates, but in a loaf like this, the soft flesh of the dates turn magically into little layers of sweet caramel waves. Bring on the date haters… they too will love this!

Start by peeling 2-3 overripe organic bananas, left whole and set in the prepared pan you will use to bake the loaf / cake in. This recipe will fit into a standard loaf pan but I used a nice 8×8 square pan instead. Set your oven to 350º and let the bananas come to temp in the oven and roast while your getting everything else ready. They should be bubbling and browning when they are ready to go (about 15-20 minutes)

In a mixer cream:

1/3 lb of butter

1/2 cup of almond butter

add 5 fresh seeded dates

Once combined scrap down the sided of the bowl and add:

1 cup of organic cane sugar

and 4 eggs (one at a time, scraping bowl once)

1 tbsp vanilla (the real deal)

In a separate bowl sift together:

2 cups of spelt flour

1 cup buckwheat flour

2 tbsp pure cocoa powder

2 tsp bp

1/2 tsp bs

pinch of fine sea salt

In a smaller bowl make the streusel by combining:

1/2 cup of course dark cane sugar

1 tsp cocoa

1 tsp cinnamon

1/3 cup of hemp hearts

a tiny pinch of fine sea salt

Remove your bananas from oven and add them into your mixer along with 1/3 of the flour mix. Once combined add 1/2 cup of organic yogurt and another 1/3 of your flour, scrap your bowl down and add the final portion of flour along with another 1/2 cup of yogurt.

Pour 1/2 of the batter into your hot pan, then sprinkle half of the streusel mix over the top, pour the rest of the batter in and cover with the rest of the streusels mixture.

Bake the loaf for 55-60 or a small cake for 40-45 minutes; these would bake off as mini loafs of muffins in 20-25 minutes.

enjoy

February 10, 2011

The whole bird, and everything from the bird.

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Truly nothing grosses me out more that seeing yellowy pink chicken breasts in a foam tray wrapped in plastic film on the grocery store shelf. Nothing, well aside from mayo, but that stems from a lifelong issue I have yet to uncover, and no desire to get into at this time. From this I am sure you can assume you will not find a “super chicken salad sandwich” recipe here, ever!

But lets get back to the bird. I can’t tell you when the last time I ate conventional chicken was. The thought of beakless caged, medicated almost translucent ghost birds eating old battery house hens, cows and often times mercury and lead rich fishmeal, had all driven me to vegetarianism for years. But in the past 5 or so years I met a number of really stand up poultry farmers, who’s farms I toured and who’s birds I came to enjoy.  Now I always laugh (sickly to myself) when I see pictures of a quant little farm on the packaging of any conventional meat & dairy products, as if the food in those containers comes from anything but industrialized processing compounds. Compounds where animal health and the impact on the health of the humans who eats those animals, is never calculated in to profit projections.

Well now I have my own little farm and a lovely flock of chooks which I have raised from 2 day old chicks through the slaughter, and the plucking, and the cleaning right to the fryer (as was the case for many of our roosters). We enjoy the chicken-ness of the chickens fluffing away in the garden, and we cherish the warm fresh multi-coloured eggs we collect each morning from our little feathered friends.  I have learned a thing or two about chicken keeping and eating this year, but more than anything, all of this chicken-ness has given me cause to celebrate the full life cycle and all the bits of a whole bird.

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